Garrett M. Broad
Professor, Researcher, Activist
Garrett M. Broad
Professor, Researcher, Activist

ABOUT

Garrett M. Broad is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication and Media Studies at Fordham University in New York City. His research investigates the role of storytelling and communication technology in promoting networked movements for social justice. Much of his work focuses on local and global food systems, as he explores how food can best contribute to improved neighborhood health, environmental sustainability, and the rights and welfare of animals. An engaged scholar, Professor Broad produces theoretical and empirical work for academic audiences, develops collaborative research projects with community-based organizations, and strives for teaching excellence in the classroom and across digital spaces.

Visit his Academia.edu page for copies of published work, samples of course syllabi, and his full CV.

BOOK

More Than Just Food:

Food Justice and Community Change

Published by the University of California Press (2016)
Purchase on Amazon.com

The industrial food system has created a crisis in the United States that is characterized by abundant food for privileged citizens and “food deserts” for the historically marginalized. In response, food justice activists based in low-income communities of color have developed community-based solutions, arguing that activities like urban agriculture, nutrition education, and food-related social enterprises can drive systemic social change. Focusing on the work of several food justice groups—including Community Services Unlimited, a South Los Angeles organization founded as the nonprofit arm of the Southern California Black Panther Party—More Than Just Food explores the possibilities and limitations of this community-based approach. It offers a networked examination of the food justice movement in the age of the nonprofit industrial complex.

Research In the News
Why We Should Make Room for Debate about High-Tech Meat
Read the article in Civil Eats
September 28, 2017
Fixing Hunger at its Roots
Read the article in Public Anthropologies of the American Anthropologist
September 26, 21017
Want to Help Animals? Don't Forget the Chickens
Read the research brief on effective animal advocacy in The Conversation
June 8, 2017
Crisis and Response in the Food System - More Than Just Food
Listen to the podcast with Fordham Conversations
October 6, 2016
Do Kids Who Grow Kale Eat Kale?
Read the research brief on school gardens in The Conversation
September 6, 2016
Food Sleuth Radio Interview with Garrett Broad
Listen to the podcast with Food Sleuth Radio
June 9, 2016
New Books Podcast: More Than Just Food
Listen to the interview with New Books Network
May 13, 2016
Not All Community Gardens Are Created Equal
Read the feature on New Food Economy
March 24, 2016
New Book Challenges "Magic Carrot Approach" to Food Justice
Read the profile on Fordham News
February 9, 2016
The Black Panther Party: A Food Justice Story
Read the column on Huffpost Politics
February 24, 2016
Food Matters — But It's Not Magical
Read the column by on UC Press Blog
March 16, 2016
Praise for More Than Just Food

More Than Just Food highlights the powerful role that food can play in connecting communities, celebrating cultural histories, and establishing a more just society for all. Combining the rigor of a scholar and the passion of an activist, Garrett M. Broad offers both practical and theoretical contributions that will help the food justice movement continue to grow.

Bryant Terry, author, activist, and recipient of a 2015 James Beard Foundation Leadership Award

Community-based organizations throughout the country are working to promote health, equity and sustainability through urban food activism. More Than Just Food offers an in-depth investigation of the potential for such activism to achieve social and racial justice in Los Angeles and beyond. As a scholar-activist, Broad offers insightful suggestions for future movement organizing, media storytelling, and policy advocacy.

Alison Hope Alkon, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of the Pacific

More Than Just Food is an utterly compelling and intellectually satisfying discussion of the historical and contemporary relevance of food justice concerns to any serious conversation about racism, community organizing, and social justice more generally. Garrett M. Broad has written a powerful account of how and why the politics of healthy food access and activism can shed new and valuable light on questions of inclusion, fairness, and inequality in an interconnected and neoliberal world.

John L. Jackson, Jr., Richard Perry University Professor and Dean of the School of Social Policy and Practice at the University of Pennsylvania

recent events

Why Effective Altruists Love Cultured Meat
Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) Conference
Boston, Massachusetts - Sheraton Downtown
Friday, September 1 at 11:00 AM EST
Effective Altruism & Animal Advocacy
Food Studies Conference
Occidental College - Los Angeles, CA
Thursday, June 15 at 9:00 AM PST
Communicating Risks of Animal Factory Farming
Conference of the International Communication Association: Strategic Environmental Communication in Crisis, Risk and Disaster.
Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel
San Diego, CA 92101
Thursday, May 25 at 1:00 PM PST
Food Insecurity and Food Justice
Fordham Urban Law Journal Symposium: How the Poor Still Pay More
Fordham Law School -150 W 62nd Street | Moot Courtroom
New York, New York 10023
Friday, April 7 at 11:00 AM EST

Applied Projects

With a commitment to scholar-activism, Professor Broad looks for opportunities to bridge theory and practice. He has co-organized festivals that bring together universities with local communities, developed participatory research partnerships to help nonprofit organizations demonstrate impact, and created websites for the purposes of popular education and translational research. A selection of these activities include:

A participatory evaluation research project conducted in collaboration with Media Mobilizing Project (MMP), a Philadelphia-based organization that aims to build a media, education and organizing infrastructure that will cohere and amplify the growing movement to end poverty. A report detailing the findings of this initiative is forthcoming in 2016.

The development of The Critical Media Project, an online teaching resource that features a wide range of annotated media artifacts, exploring the politics of identity across issues of race and ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality. The project was developed under the direction of Professor Alison Trope and in conjunction with students at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

The creation of MetaConnects, an online space for knowledge sharing between communication researchers and community-based practitioners. The initiative was formed as the community-based research arm of the Metamorphosis Project, an urban communication research project led by Professor Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach.

A participatory evaluation research project conducted in collaboration with Media Mobilizing Project (MMP), a Philadelphia-based organization that aims to build a media, education and organizing infrastructure that will cohere and amplify the growing movement to end poverty. A report detailing the findings of this initiative is forthcoming in 2016.

The Critical Media Project, an online teaching resource that features a wide range of annotated media artifacts, exploring the politics of identity across issues of race and ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality. The project was developed under the direction of Professor Alison Trope and in conjunction with students at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

MetaConnects, an online space for knowledge sharing between communication researchers and community-based practitioners. The initiative was formed as the community-based research arm of the Metamorphosis Project, an urban communication research project led by Professor Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach.

A participatory evaluation research project conducted in collaboration with Media Mobilizing Project (MMP), a Philadelphia-based organization that aims to build a media, education and organizing infrastructure that will cohere and amplify the growing movement to end poverty. A report detailing the findings of this initiative is forthcoming in 2016.

The development of The Critical Media Project, an online teaching resource that features a wide range of annotated media artifacts, exploring the politics of identity across issues of race and ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality. The project was developed under the direction of Professor Alison Trope and in conjunction with students at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

The creation of MetaConnects, an online space for knowledge sharing between communication researchers and community-based practitioners. The initiative was formed as the community-based research arm of the Metamorphosis Project, an urban communication research project led by Professor Sandra J. Ball-Rokeach.